SPFx webpart with MS Graph and PnPjs: step by step guide

So you want to build an SPFx webpart which uses MS Graph API through PnPjs. Here is step by step guide on how to do that.

A few months ago I wrote a similar post, however, things were changed, some things were simplified a lot, that’s why this is a revisited guide. Also, I’ve addressed some additional steps here. The source code sample is available at GitHub.

Prerequisites

  • SPFx >= 1.6
  • PnPjs >= 1.2.4

1. Scaffold SPFx webpart solution with React

This step is pretty self-explanatory, simply run yo @microsoft/sharepoint, select React, give your webpart a name, do not change other defaults asked by yeoman.

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How to create SharePoint Online add-in with ASP.NET Core 2.1

While support of .NET Core for SharePoint CSOM libraries on its own way (still no ETA), you can create a SharePoint add-in with ASP.NET Core 2.1 today. Of course, it adds some inconveniences, but at least you can target the latest version of ASP.NET. I’ve created a sample project at GitHub here so you can easily try it. This post describes how to configure everything to run it.

First of all, a few drawbacks worth mentioning:

- you can’t use F5 experience in Visual Studio for convenient debugging. Instead, you should manually upload your app into a site and attach Visual Studio to running web application.

- you can’t target a project to netcoreapp. Obviously you can’t do it because SharePoint CSOM for .NET Core is not available yet. That’s why you have to retarget your project to .NET Framework instead. Which means that you lose cross platform feature. If that’s essential thing for you, then you should wait for official .NET Core support. 

- solution described here only works for SharePoint Online. On-premises is a completely different story and out of the scope of the post

Let’s get started. More...

Stylelint with SPFx integration

Are you TypeScript developer? I bet you use tslint in all your TypeScript projects! If not – start using it. SharePoint framework has tslint step which validates your code against tslint rules, which is awesome. More and more web developers today also use stylelint. Stylelint can be easily explained in just three words – linter for css/scss. Modern web developer (and of course modern SharePoint developer) has to write a lot of css or scss code. So why don’t we lint css code as well? Checkout increasing interest in stylelint at npmtrends:

SharePoint Framework in current version doesn’t have built-in stylelint support. However we can easily fix it with custom gulp subtask. Let’s do it right away! More...

What’s new and what’s changed in SharePoint Online REST API in October 2018

It’s November and it’s time to review changes in SharePoint REST API in October with help of SharePoint RESE API Explorer. As usual I have to put below caution:

Please note, that all changes are gathered from Targeted tenant. Most likely this changes haven’t been officially introduced yet, use this post as spoilers to potential upcoming features. If you want to use APIs mentioned here, please check corresponding official documentation to make sure they are available.

With REST API explorer you can navigate between different endpoints, explore their structure, methods, classes and parameters. REST API explorer uses _api/$metadata endpoint to get the REST API data, parses it and presents in tree view format. REST API explorer also stores historical $metadata results in Azure storage making it possible to compare $metadata results we have today and month ago. More...

TypeScript Tips: How to reduce the size of a bundle

While developing with TypeScript, you might notice that your bundle size becomes bigger despite all minification techniques. Of course, as your code grows, your bundle will also grow. However there is one hint, which might help you and reduce the size of a resulting bundle. The hint works really good for web projects, which use TypeScript together with webpack. It also means, that this hint is applicable to SPFx solutions as well.

The new size of a bundle heavily depends on your TypeScript code, TypeScript features you use and the amount of TypeScript files you have in your solution. For small solutions it might not work, for mid and big ones it definitely works. Anyway you can verify it on your own solution to see the difference. Let’s get started! More...