Using PnPjs to send requests to MS Graph with SharePoint Framework 1.6

SPFx 1.6 was released recently and a lot of new and interesting features were introduced. AadTokenProvider, AadHttpClient, MSGraphClient  went to GA, which are my favorite features. One of the common thing in SPFx development is accessing other resources, protected with Azure AD. For example you might have your LOB API with Azure AD protection and you want to consume that API from SPFx web part (extension). Before SPFx 1.6 it was a bit challenging, because you have to deal with cookies attached to your asynchronous http request or with custom “patched” adal.js implementation. SPFx 1.6 features mentioned earlier drastically simplify the task to access Azure AD protected resources. Now you can access Azure AD APIs (including Microsoft APIs like MS Graph) from SPFx with ease!

I’m pretty sure you know about PnPjs library. It has a lot of cool features, among them a fluent interface to SharePoint and Graph API. WIth SPFx 1.6 release you can use PnPjs as your Graph client without hassle. Read further to find out how. More...

Call Azure AD secured API from your SPFx code. Story #1.1: Azure Web App with ASP.NET Core 2.x and cookie authentication (xhr "with credentials")

Call Azure AD secured API from your SPFx code series:

  1. Call Azure AD secured API from your SPFx code. Story #1: Azure Functions with cookie authentication (xhr "with credentials")
  2. Call Azure AD secured API from your SPFx code. Story #1.1: Azure Web App with ASP.NET Core 2.x and cookie authentication (xhr "with credentials") <—you are here
  3. Call Azure AD secured API from your SPFx code. Story #2: Web app (or Azure Function) and SPFx with adal.js
  4. Call Azure AD secured API from your SPFx code. Story #3: Web app (or Azure Function) and SPFx with AadHttpClient

In the previous post, I showed an example on how to call Azure Functions API protected with Azure AD (using EasyAuth setup). Described approach has a few limitations, one which is the most important is an inability to send HTTP POST or PUT requests. This issue can be fixed by using regular ASP.NET Web API application with custom authentication layer. More info about this approach you can find here - Access the API by leveraging SharePoint Online authentication cookie. This post describes required steps to make it work:

  1. Add new app registration in Azure AD
  2. Create new ASP.NET Core application and setup authentication with Azure AD.
  3. Enable CORS for your web application with credentials support (so we can send CORS AJAX and attach credentials to our request, auth cookie in our case)
  4. Create simple SPFx webpart, which gets data from our web app via authenticated HTTP request (GET and POST).

The source code for this article available on GitHub here.

Let’s get started. More...